About Lunar New Year Festival

Lunar New Year Festival aims to highlight the abundance of events happening across Vancouver and Richmond, Canada celebrating Spring, Chinese New Year and traditional Asian New Year. The Festival is your guide to discovering a whole new world of festive traditions at a myriad of independent events across the region.

February 2019 marks the Year of the Pig and promises to be a feast for the intrepid culture seeker and families alike! Prepare to be amazed by traditional lion dances, indulge in festive treats, get crafty making your own paper lanterns, toe-tap to lively cultural performances, and much more.

 The Festival has been made possible through the partnership of Tourism Richmond and Tourism Vancouver, and is supported by the Province of British Columbia. 

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About Lunar New Year

Lunar New Year is celebrated in many parts of Asia including China, Taiwan and Vietnam and follows the lunisolar calendar with celebrations that lasts from the new moon through to the 15th day of the first Lunar Calendar month, also known as the Lantern Festival which marks the end of the festivities. Lunar New Year can also often be called Spring Festival or Chinese New Year, and with thousands of years of history, the celebration carries with it ancient and vibrant traditions.

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Traditions of Lunar New Year

  Lion Dances  Performers in brightly coloured lion costumes bring good luck and fortune by mimicking a lion’s movements to the beat of drums and gongs.

Lion Dances
Performers in brightly coloured lion costumes bring good luck and fortune by mimicking a lion’s movements to the beat of drums and gongs.

  Firecrackers  Lit in front of houses and storefronts. Traditionally, it’s believed that the loud noise scares off evil spirits. Today they’re also used to add to the festivities, a tradition that children often look forward to.

Firecrackers
Lit in front of houses and storefronts. Traditionally, it’s believed that the loud noise scares off evil spirits. Today they’re also used to add to the festivities, a tradition that children often look forward to.

  Family Reunion  Families gather on Lunar New Year’s Eve for a homemade reunion dinner. It’s the most important meal of the year with fish, noodles, dumplings and more.

Family Reunion
Families gather on Lunar New Year’s Eve for a homemade reunion dinner. It’s the most important meal of the year with fish, noodles, dumplings and more.

  Red Envelopes  Traditionally, children receive these lucky envelopes lined with money from older family members as a blessing. The importance is not the money inside but the red envelope itself, a symbol of good wishes for the year ahead.

Red Envelopes
Traditionally, children receive these lucky envelopes lined with money from older family members as a blessing. The importance is not the money inside but the red envelope itself, a symbol of good wishes for the year ahead.

  Red Lanterns & Decor  Homes, streets and storefronts are adorned with red decor to ward off bad luck. Red couplets are pasted on doors with good wishes for the coming year written on them.

Red Lanterns & Decor
Homes, streets and storefronts are adorned with red decor to ward off bad luck. Red couplets are pasted on doors with good wishes for the coming year written on them.

  Praying at the Temple  Lunar New Year is a busy time for Chinese temples as guests visit the temple to light incenses and pray for blessings and good luck for the coming year.

Praying at the Temple
Lunar New Year is a busy time for Chinese temples as guests visit the temple to light incenses and pray for blessings and good luck for the coming year.

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When is Lunar New Year?

2019: February 5, Year of the Pig
2020: January 25, Year of the Rat
2021: February 12, Year of the Ox